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Thank you for visiting our restaurant online!

Thanks for visiting our restaurant online.

We specialize in authentic Italian food from our signature Lasagna, Neapolitan pizza, Risotto Gamberi to Tour of Italy and Italian Trio.

Having served Fort Worth Texas since 2006 in this historic ”McAdams Building” right off Belknap St. just minutes away from downtown, now we proudly introduced “B.Y.O.B” features to offer more customers with valuable experiences.

Today, we strive to keep family friendly experience for our customers and wonderful Italian food every visit.

Again, thank you for joining us and we hope you enjoy every bite from us.

A Riverside Landmark

The McAdams Building

The McAdams Building has been an important commercial building and an anchor for the Six Points commercial district since James A. McAdams built it in 1931.

James A. McAdams was a well-known Riverside citizen and property owner. He built two other buildings near this same location at earlier dates, but it is the 1931 building that has captured the hearts and imagination of Riverside residents for many years for several reasons: McAdams was the home of Scott Drug Co., a Riverside institution; it also has a clever triangular design that commands Six Points; and the building is an example of the unique and stylish architecture of a bygone era when Six Points was the heart of Riverside.

The first building McAdams built was a spacious frame structure divided into spaces for three businesses, one of which housed McAdams’ drug and general merchandise store. Located at the southwest corner of Race and Riverside Drive, this structure was built facing Race Street around 1910.

At this time there was no “Six Points” – the intersection of Race, Riverside, and Belknap (then called Grapevine Pike) only formed a “four points”, because Riverside Drive went no further north than Race, and the portion of Belknap from downtown northeast to Riverside Drive did not yet exist. Locals sometimes called this four points intersection “Four Corners”.
McAdams retired in 1924 and shortly thereafter rented space to Lee R. Scott, a druggist who operated Scott Drug Co. from this intersection for nearly 40 years. This first building constructed by McAdams was demolished in 1930 – 31 to make way for the expansion of Belknap Street.
The second McAdams building was constructed in 1929 across the street, at the southeast corner of Race and Riverside Drive. This substantial brick building faced Race and was home to Hilliard Furniture Co. and Kemble Bros. Furniture from 1929 to 1954. A two-story brick addition was made to the building in 1957. Later tenants included an auto parts store, a carpet store, and the last tenant was W. J. Hancock Paint Co., which was there from 1975 until the building was demolished in 1985. The site is now occupied by an auto parts store.

In 1931 major changes came to the intersection where the two McAdams commercial buildings stood. No more “Four Corners” but hello “Six Points”. Riverside Drive was extended north of Race Street in 1927 and Belknap Street was extended out from downtown in 1931 forming a six-points intersection where Race Street, Riverside Drive and Belknap Street intersected. The old frame McAdams building was demolished and a new structure built at what now was the corner of Riverside Drive and Belknap.

The new McAdams building was an impressive structure for Riverside, which at that time still had a great many rural elements. As described many years later in a survey of Tarrant County’s most significant historic buildings, the McAdams Building is a “…one-story, L-plan brick structure that occupies a highly visible corner…The building’s storefront bays are divided by piers which penetrate the parapet roof to form small stepped gables topped by an urn.” The building contained large plate-glass windows topped by curved transom panes, a mezzanine, and at the most prominent exterior point of the building a large keystone proudly proclaiming “McAdams 1931”.
In 1931 major changes came to the intersection where the two McAdams commercial buildings stood. No more “Four Corners” but hello “Six Points”. Riverside Drive was extended north of Race Street in 1927 and Belknap Street was extended out from downtown in 1931 forming a six-points intersection where Race Street, Riverside Drive and Belknap Street intersected. The old frame McAdams building was demolished and a new structure built at what now was the corner of Riverside Drive and Belknap.
The 1931 McAdams Building was the home of Scott Drug Co. from the time it was built until the drug store closed in 1962. Other tenants over the years included grocery and variety stores, barber shop, beauty salon, other retail businesses, and for quite some time the Sylvania Station post office. The McAdams Building was an anchor for the Six Points commercial mecca, which included Hilliard’s Furniture Store, burger joints, Riverside Baptist Church, the Melody Shop, Riverside Masonic Lodge, Pat Sneed’s photo studio, Riverside State Bank, the post office, the Griddle, the Tower Theater, and other businesses.
Over the years, however, the building began a long decline, as repairs became more and more expensive and income from the building decreased.

In 1997, members of the Riverside Alliance, a coalition of Riverside neighborhood association, began discussions with the McAdams Building owners, who were some of the grandchildren of J.A. McAdams. The Riverside Alliance envisioned rejuvenating the McAdams Building as a multi-use community facility, and in the process sparking revitalization of Six Points. The building owners were enthusiastic and supportive of this ambitious project. For years, they refused to allow the building to be demolished but were unable to personally undertake the massive renovation project. The Riverside Alliance set to work promoting the project and raising funds, but with Riverside real estate prices rising because of new commercial construction on Beach Street, it soon became apparent that this project was beyond the scope of what a small, non-profit organization could accomplish.
McAdams descendants sold the McAdams Building to a new owner in 2004. The new owner had no ties to Riverside, saw only the value of the land at a prominent intersection, and planned to use the property for a used-car lot. The building was gutted in preparation for demolition. The pressed-tin ceiling, the curved windows, and the stone urns sitting atop the building were all removed. Riverside Alliance advisors met with the owner to discuss options for saving the building. The only option offered by the owner was to purchase the building. Demolition was planned for March 2004.
Riverside citizens were alarmed. Several other prominent Riverside buildings had been demolished or moved, including Riverside Elementary School, the 1929 McAdams Building, the Tower Theater, the Ivey Block commercial buildings, and the J.B. Baker manse, and they were determined not to lose another. Working together through the Riverside Alliance, determined citizens began a two-pronged strategy to save the building: have the City of Fort Worth delay permitting the demolition to allow time to find a buyers and find a new buyer willing to preserve the building.

After numerous City hearing, the Fort Worth City Council approved a six month demolition delay designation for the building. As the deadline approached, Riverside residents appealed to the Fort Worth City Council for assistance. The press became interested and articles began appearing describing the plight of the McAdams Building and the attempts to save it.

Riverside activists interested in the future development of Belknap Street recruited Robert Bell, who had family ties and real estate interests in the area, to consider buying the building. Bell, a Haltom City native living in California, became intrigued with the McAdams Building and the community’s efforts to save it from demolition. After numerous meetings with city officials and the owner, Bell purchased the McAdams Building the day it was scheduled to be demolished.
The new owner took efforts to bring new life to the building by renovating it and finding new uses for it. The building housed a new City of Fort Worth Neighborhood Police Office once and now a premise for Italian restaurant operated by local family, also a hair salon for men and women that brings clientele from across DFW area.
Riverside citizens, the City of Fort Worth and Robert Bell saved the McAdams Building. A Riverside landmark lives again.
Research and edited by Rick Herring and Libby Willis.